Deceased Friars


Patrick Scanlon, OFM

Patrick Scanlon

1930 – 1947

Fr. Patrick Scanlon, OFM, was born on Sept. 30, 1880 in Philadelphia. Completing his studies at St. Charles Seminary, Philadelphia, he was ordained in 1909 and served for 28 years in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. He ministered as pastor of St. Bartholomew’s Parish there from 1919 to 1930.

In 1932, Fr. Pat became a novice with the Jesuits, but returned to the diocese and served as chaplain for the Glen Riddle Franciscan Sisters from 1933 to 1937. He entered the novitiate at St. Bonaventure Friary in Paterson, N.J., in 1937, professing temporary vows one year later. He made his solemn profession in 1941.

During his nine years as a friar, he was stationed in Paterson, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and New York City. His ready smile and his willingness to be of help in any possible way won him the respect and affection of the friars with whom he lived. A born optimist, he always felt everything would work out well “if we simply have a little patience.”

He died on Dec. 16, 1947 at St. Elizabeth Hospital, Brighton, Mass. Fr. Patrick was 67 years old, a professed friar for nine years and a priest for 38 years.

Each of us should be called a lesser brother, a Friar Minor. Each one of us should wash the feet of the others.”

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Patrick Scanlon, OFM

Patrick Scanlon

1930 – 1947

Fr. Patrick Scanlon, OFM, was born on Sept. 30, 1880 in Philadelphia. Completing his studies at St. Charles Seminary, Philadelphia, he was ordained in 1909 and served for 28 years in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. He ministered as pastor of St. Bartholomew’s Parish there from 1919 to 1930.

In 1932, Fr. Pat became a novice with the Jesuits, but returned to the diocese and served as chaplain for the Glen Riddle Franciscan Sisters from 1933 to 1937. He entered the novitiate at St. Bonaventure Friary in Paterson, N.J., in 1937, professing temporary vows one year later. He made his solemn profession in 1941.

During his nine years as a friar, he was stationed in Paterson, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and New York City. His ready smile and his willingness to be of help in any possible way won him the respect and affection of the friars with whom he lived. A born optimist, he always felt everything would work out well “if we simply have a little patience.”

He died on Dec. 16, 1947 at St. Elizabeth Hospital, Brighton, Mass. Fr. Patrick was 67 years old, a professed friar for nine years and a priest for 38 years.