Deceased Friars


Pacificus Kennedy, OFM

Pacificus Kennedy,

1904 – 1995

Fr. Pacificus Kennedy, OFM, was born on Dec. 16, 1904 in Brooklyn, N.Y. He attended college at Mount St. Mary’s in Emmitsburg, Md., Columbia University in New York City, and St. Francis College in Brooklyn before entering the novitiate at St. Bonaventure Friary in Paterson, N.J., in 1926. He professed simple vows there in 1927 and made his solemn profession in 1930. Later that year, he was ordained a priest.

During his busy life, Fr. Pax was a teacher, a retreat master, a parochial vicar, a Newman Club chaplain, a hospital chaplain, a preacher for Friar Magazine, and a very gifted writer. His whirlwind career took him to St. Joseph Seraphic Seminary in Callicoon, N.Y., St. Francis of Assisi Parish in New York City, Holy Name College in Washington, and ministries in the Bronx, N.Y., Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Rochelle Park, N.J., Denver, Paterson, and Boston.

A friar of inexhaustible energy and love, he was known as a remarkable friar whose enthusiasm for ministry and dedication to the intellectual life were admirable. Fr. Pax was an exceptional writer with a love for great literature — and everything that pertained to Franciscana. He left behind an exceptional body of writing. His study of Waugh’s “Brideshead Revisited,” which appeared in America magazine in 1982, remains the definitive study of that remarkable novel. Fr. Pax’s final work on Blessed John Duns Scotus titled “The Perfect Mediator” appeared in Friar Lines, 1993, issue 3.

He died on Sept. 21, 1995 in Boston. Fr. Pax was 90 years old, a professed friar for 68 years and priest for 64 years.

Each of us should be called a lesser brother, a Friar Minor. Each one of us should wash the feet of the others.”

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Pacificus Kennedy, OFM

Pacificus Kennedy,

1904 – 1995

Fr. Pacificus Kennedy, OFM, was born on Dec. 16, 1904 in Brooklyn, N.Y. He attended college at Mount St. Mary’s in Emmitsburg, Md., Columbia University in New York City, and St. Francis College in Brooklyn before entering the novitiate at St. Bonaventure Friary in Paterson, N.J., in 1926. He professed simple vows there in 1927 and made his solemn profession in 1930. Later that year, he was ordained a priest.

During his busy life, Fr. Pax was a teacher, a retreat master, a parochial vicar, a Newman Club chaplain, a hospital chaplain, a preacher for Friar Magazine, and a very gifted writer. His whirlwind career took him to St. Joseph Seraphic Seminary in Callicoon, N.Y., St. Francis of Assisi Parish in New York City, Holy Name College in Washington, and ministries in the Bronx, N.Y., Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Rochelle Park, N.J., Denver, Paterson, and Boston.

A friar of inexhaustible energy and love, he was known as a remarkable friar whose enthusiasm for ministry and dedication to the intellectual life were admirable. Fr. Pax was an exceptional writer with a love for great literature — and everything that pertained to Franciscana. He left behind an exceptional body of writing. His study of Waugh’s “Brideshead Revisited,” which appeared in America magazine in 1982, remains the definitive study of that remarkable novel. Fr. Pax’s final work on Blessed John Duns Scotus titled “The Perfect Mediator” appeared in Friar Lines, 1993, issue 3.

He died on Sept. 21, 1995 in Boston. Fr. Pax was 90 years old, a professed friar for 68 years and priest for 64 years.